Houghton Lectures

Houghton Lecture - Leo P. Kadanoff, Perimeter Inst/ U. Chicago
May 3, 2012
4pm-5pm
54-915

Small Programs, Big Ideas:
In Praise of “Little Science”.

This talk is about deep ideas and how they might be realized using only the simplest of means. It is particularly aimed at computer simulations. There is a tension between making a simulation as simple as possible or alternatively, adding bells and whistles to make it as accurate as possible. In fact, both kinds of simulations are necessary.

Co-sponsored by the Lorenz Center and the MIT Program on Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate

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Small Programs, Big Ideas:
In Praise of “Little Science”.

This talk is about deep ideas and how they might be realized using only the simplest of means. It is particularly aimed at computer simulations. There is a tension between making a simulation as simple as possible or alternatively, adding bells and whistles to make it as accurate as possible. In fact, both kinds of simulations are necessary.

Co-sponsored by the Lorenz Center and the MIT Program on Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate

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Small Programs, Big Ideas:
In Praise of “Little Science”.

This talk is about deep ideas and how they might be realized using only the simplest of means. It is particularly aimed at computer simulations. There is a tension between making a simulation as simple as possible or alternatively, adding bells and whistles to make it as accurate as possible. In fact, both kinds of simulations are necessary.

Co-sponsored by the Lorenz Center and the MIT Program on Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate

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Small Programs, Big Ideas:
In Praise of “Little Science”.

This talk is about deep ideas and how they might be realized using only the simplest of means. It is particularly aimed at computer simulations. There is a tension between making a simulation as simple as possible or alternatively, adding bells and whistles to make it as accurate as possible. In fact, both kinds of simulations are necessary.

Co-sponsored by the Lorenz Center and the MIT Program on Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate

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